Pumpkin Rescue

I don’t know if it’s simply a new found appreciation for eatting with the seasons, or pregnancy cravings, but I haven’t been able to get enough of the pumpkin this season.

I was at a friend’s house about a week ago and she mentioned that it was time for her to throw away the pumpkin decorating her doorway.  I looked at it and it looked fine to me, but what do I know.  Nevertheless, I volunteered to take it off her hands.

I took it home and roasted it and turned some of it into a pumpkin souffle.  It was good.  I took pictures of all but the finished product. D’OH!  The hardest part for me is slicing the pumpkin in half to make 2 dome shapes.  I think a kid’s pumpkin carving kit would make it easier — but any sharp knife would do.

After you cut the pumpkin into 2 domes (top and bottom, not side and side), take out the guts.  Keep the seeds for roasting.  Then place domes face down in a roasting pan.  I roasted this pumpkin for an hour.  The steam helps the process, so try not to check on them.  If you underroast it, it will be hard to separate the pumpking meat from the skin.  If you do it right, it should come apart almost on its own.  Then I mash the insides in a bowl with a potato masher.

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3 Comments

  1. Theresa said,

    November 26, 2008 at 10:32 am

    I am completely obsessed with pumpkin! Did you make pumpkin pancakes awhile back? If not too much trouble, could you share your recipe?

  2. Gretchen said,

    November 26, 2008 at 10:36 am

    I’ve peeled a pumpkin before but never thought of roasting it first! Can I ask why top/bottom not side/side?

  3. Einat said,

    November 26, 2008 at 12:52 pm

    Theresa – Here’s the recipe we use: http://www.fatfree.com/recipes/breakfast/pumpkin-pancakes
    The only thing we add is when you put the batter on the griddle, we add about 5 dark chocolate chips on top of the raw side.

    Gret – this might just be me talking out of my ass, but I think that the top/bottom combo keeps the steam in a little better, and then you don’t have to worry about how to divide up the stemmy part. I actually enjoy plucking out the stem at the end of the process — it comes off clean with no effort.


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